Green Travel Guide to the Mid Wales

Words by Florence Fortnam. Film produced by Green Traveller.
Artwork for Green Traveller's Guides by Tina Smith and Mark Edwards.

Foreword by Julie Lewis, Tourism and Marketing Manager, Powys County Council

 

Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons has long been considered an outdoor lovers' paradise. The largest and most rural county in Wales is quite literally surrounded by mountains, from the Brecon Beacons and Black Mountains ranges in the south, to the Cambrian Mountains in the west, and the Berwyn Mountains in the north, there is an extensive network of footpaths, cycle routes and bridleways to explore.

 

However, the spectacular mountain ranges are not all we have to offer. We have some of the country's most spectacular scenery just waiting to be explored. The diverse and scenic landscape here in Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons also features tranquil lakes, canals and rivers, limestone caves, ancient woodlands, dramatic waterfalls, lush green valleys and intriguing historic sites. There are bustling market towns and villages throughout the area, with a strong sense of community, which is reflected in a diverse and eclectic calendar of events and festivals that take place through the year.

 

Alongside our museums and galleries, fascinating attractions, adrenaline-fuelled activities, range of quality places to stay and delicious local food and drink, you have the perfect recipe for a holiday to remember.

Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons has long been considered an outdoor lovers' paradise. The largest and most rural county in Wales is quite literally surrounded by mountains, from the Brecon Beacons and Black Mountains ranges in the south, to the Cambrian Mountains in the west, and the Berwyn Mountains in the north, there is an extensive network of footpaths, cycle routes and bridleways to explore.

Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons is first and foremost a living landscape, on which those lucky enough to live and work here depend on for their inspiration and creativity, and for the natural resources which are at the heart of many businesses in the area.

 

The landscape is the backdrop for the two biggest industries in Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons - tourism and agriculture - and both have an important role to play in managing and protecting the very landscape on which they depend, and we hope our visitors will want to play their part, too. They may seem like small things, but buying local produce or leaving your car at home and taking the bus to the start of your walk will have a positive environmental impact.

 

We care about Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons - the landscape, our communities, and our visitors - and we hope our visitors will want to care about the area, too.

We want to encourage visitors to enjoy and share the things we know are special about this area, to be welcomed and included as part of our community while visiting, to find the unexpected hidden places that only the locals know about, and to go home with vivid memories of your visit and reasons to come back again soon.

This Green Traveller's Guide to Mid Wales will highlight many of the great places to stay and eat, show you how easy it is to get around, how to find the best places to visit or the most enjoyable activities to make the most of your stay.

Mid Wales and the Brecon Beacons is a wonderful holiday destination - we hope to see you here soon!

What our writers discovered in Mid Wales

Often referred to as the ‘green heart of Wales’, Mid Wales is the largest county in Wales and includes the Brecon Beacons National Park, the Cambrian Mountains and the Dyfi Biosphere. The area has more than its fair share of natural beauty spots, boasting landscapes of verdant hills and rugged peaks, of lonely valleys, stunning beaches, meandering rivers and glistening lakes. Every year a fine collection of cultural events such as the Hay Festival, the Machynlleth Comedy Festival, the Brecon Jazz Festival and Green Man draw throngs of art, literature and music lovers to the region.

  • Mid Wales is home to the Brecon Breacons National Park, Wales’ first Dark Sky area
     

  • Mid Wales is home to the Royal Welsh Show, the biggest rural jamboree in Europe
     

  • The Dyfi Valley is Wales’ one and only UNESCO Biosphere reserve; others include Yellowstone National Park, Uluru and Mount Olympus
     

  • At 240ft, Pistyll Rhaeadr (near Lake Vrynwy in the Berwyn Mountains) is the highest water in Wales (and England) – it's even higher that Niagara Falls!
     

  • Mid Wales has over 12,000 individual public rights of way, many of which are used largely for recreation, particularly walking, cycling, and horse-riding
     

  • Mid Wales has 150,000 hectares of open access land – approximately 29% of the landmass of Mid Wales

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